Author Topic: Why Ti

sam

Why Ti
« on: May 22, 2012 »
Following on from my post about Enigma, here are some of the properties of titanium, discovered in Cornwall by William Gregor in 1791 and named after the Titans of Greek mythology:

It's a precious metal
Semi-precious, at least.


Gregor gazes upon his discovery

Its intrinsic value is given added lustre by practical applications. Titanium is strong and light, and capable of withstanding attack by hydrocholric acid as well as chlorine gas, which is useful if those are common environmental factors on your rides.

It looks great
The bare metal industrial look never goes out of style, unlike colours such as orange, which fell into worldwide disuse through much of the early 20th century, and red, in America in the 50s.


Some states experimented with purple stop signs until the hippie scare of the 60s

It absorbs road shock
You can ride a properly tuned titanium bicycle over cobbled streets and mix martinis at the same time, stirred, not shaken. Comfort isn't the only consideration. Other materials, such as so-called 'steel', have an appalling safety record.


They weren't riding Ti

It's expensive
Note that it's important to make sure people know you got yours before the unfortunate influx of titanium frames from Murdoch-controlled China and other countries influenced by his malignant scheme to devalue the titanium brand.


A small sideline to his hacking

It's used in airplanes
Or so I'm always reading. Join the mile high club without leaving the ground.



It's not carbon-fibre
Not that there's anything wrong with carbon-fibre. Or is there?

Kenjaja

  • Guest
Re: why ti
« Reply #1 on: May 28, 2012 »
Ti is fashion for fashion's sake. People keep trying new materials for bicycles but they never catch on.
Here are a few examples.
Wood
Two problems with this material. One is getting splinters in the backside; the other is woodworm. Can you imagine limping in to your nearest A&E and asking a fit young nurse if she could extract the splinters from your backside (or is that your fantasy?). You might only realise your bike had woodworm on returning to your bike to find the lock sitting sadly in a pile of sawdust.
Bakelite
This will be much better used for a case to generate hissing noises and occasional announcements that Poland has been invaded.
Bamnboo
Same as wood but nastier splinters
Plastic
A material which is much better suited to washing bowls and other kitchen paraphernalia - (at least that is what my wife tells me.)
Aluminium
This is much too light and is therefore a ridiculous material to make a bike from. It will never catch on.
Steel
This may have a future in a niche market.
Carbon Fiber
We all know that carbon (or "charcoal" as I prefer to call it) is great for burning burgers on the barbecue and would have the advantage that you could cook food when you fail to find a cake shop. This would prevent mass starvation for cyclists but, having burnt our bikes, how would we get home?
Cast Iron
This is the durable material for bicycles. Mine is still going strong since its purchase in 1896. I once rode my trusty 'Ci' steed 375 yards without stopping. Ci is the future.

sam

Re: why ti
« Reply #2 on: May 29, 2012 »
Quote
Cast Iron
This is the durable material for bicycles.


The old Pashley factory

Quote
Bakelite
This will be much better used for a case to generate hissing noises and occasional announcements that Poland has been invaded.

I caught a bit of a documentary on this wonder material some years ago:










Kenjaja

  • Guest
Re: why ti
« Reply #3 on: May 29, 2012 »
I think this proves my point about about bakelite and its lack of suitability in bicycle construction.  Just take a look at the TdeF archives for proof that team AOC (Aliens from the Orion Cluster) have never won anything.

(Caution do not confuse team AOC (Aliens from the Orion Cluster) with team AOC (Aliens from Over the Channel).  The latter team have been known to win a jersey or two.

I had absolutely no idea that bakelite was made from Marmite and Domestos. This seems like a terrible waste of Marmite to me. It may explain why my local Tesco store keeps running out of Marmite - it is probably aliens buying the stuff to build a new supertanker or something similar.

Frenchie

  • Guest
Re: Why ti
« Reply #4 on: June 10, 2012 »
Aluminium, steel and carbon fibres are all used in the aero world, both on engines and airframes.

sam

Re: Why ti
« Reply #5 on: June 11, 2012 »
Caution do not confuse team AOC (Aliens from the Orion Cluster) with team AOC (Aliens from Over the Channel).

Aliens you say? The Orion Cluster you say?

Aluminium, steel and carbon fibres are all used in the aero world

Not to mention paper



which I was disappointed to learn these aren't made out of

Frenchie

  • Guest
Why Al?
« Reply #6 on: June 11, 2012 »
Because a Cannondale CAAD is probably one of the nicest frames I have ever ridden, a frame one can thoroughly enjoy and use. Light, stiff, comfortable over distance, beautifully designed1 & made2 and well equiped out of the box, as a complete bike3. Mine is 3 years old and "handmade in the USA"4 and I would buy another one tomorrow. In many ways it is not what the vox populi typically makes of an aluminium5 frame; and even if the material ages and fatigues, let us remember that pleasure, by definition, is ephemeral.

1 Horizontal top tube.
2 Welds.
3 Only major change has been a new pair of soft Continental GP4000 tyres every year (they last 6 months).
4 Not than the USA are a typical place for elegant mechanical design. I favour European design in general.
5 Note the spelling.

sam

Re: Why Al?
« Reply #7 on: June 12, 2012 »
One often reads gloomy predictions about aluminium fatigue strength, but I'd be curious how often it actually fails, at least during the life of the owner.

My oldest and most travelled bike, currently serving time on a turbo, is Al.

Quote
pleasure, by definition, is ephemeral.

Less so if you're a tantric cyclist.

Re: Why Al?
« Reply #8 on: June 12, 2012 »
I think about frame failure now and again. My Al frame is unlacquered. Which means I have to get all abrasive on it now again. I imagine sometimes that I might overdo it and that I will one day set out on tubing that has been all but polished away, and that its gossamer remains will simply blow away like hopseed as the headwind gathers, leaving me pedalling a frameless bicycle - an assembly of components held in place for a moment by their forward motion. That probably isn't how it will happen. I think it wants to be a Ti bicycle.

sam

Re: Why Al?
« Reply #9 on: June 13, 2012 »
All I know about physics I learned from Wiley E. Coyote, so this may be implausible, but I would postulate that as an object in motion tends to stay in motion, you should be able to carry on as long as you keep pedalling.